Collection: Part 1

Research PART1 +PART2+PART3

PRISM

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PRSIM

PRISM is a secret code name for a program under which the United States National Security Agency (NSA) collects internet communications from at least nine major US internet companies.[1][2][3] The program is also known by the SIGADUS-984XN.[4][5] PRISM collects stored internet communications based on demands made to internet companies such as Google Inc. under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act of 2008 to turn over any data that match court-approved search terms.[6] The NSA can use these PRISM requests to target communications that were encrypted when they traveled across the internet backbone, to focus on stored data that telecommunication filtering systems discarded earlier,[7][8] and to get data that is easier to handle, among other things.[9]

PRISM began in 2007 in the wake of the passage of the Protect America Act under the Bush Administration.[10][11] The program is operated under the supervision of the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court, or FISC) pursuant to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).[12] Its existence was leaked six years later by NSA contractor Edward Snowden, who warned that the extent of mass data collection was far greater than the public knew and included what he characterized as "dangerous" and "criminal" activities.[13] The disclosures were published by The Guardian and The Washington Post on June 6, 2013. Subsequent documents have demonstrated a financial arrangement between NSA's Special Source Operations division (SSO) and PRISM partners in the millions of dollars.[14]

Documents indicate that PRISM is "the number one source of raw intelligence used for NSA analytic reports", and it accounts for 91% of the NSA's internet traffic acquired under FISA section 702 authority."[15][16] The leaked information came to light one day after the revelation that the FISA Court had been ordering a subsidiary of telecommunications company Verizon Communications to turn over to the NSA logs tracking all of its customers' telephone calls.[17][18]

U.S. government officials have disputed some aspects of the Guardian and Washington Post stories and have defended the program by asserting it cannot be used on domestic targets without a warrant, that it has helped to prevent acts of terrorism, and that it receives independent oversight from the federal government's executivejudicial and legislative branches.[19][20]On June 19, 2013, U.S. President Barack Obama, during a visit to Germany, stated that the NSA's data gathering practices constitute "a circumscribed, narrow system directed at us being able to protect our people.

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http://www.nbc-2.com/story/34676191/fire-crews-monitoring-hot-spots-in-lehigh-acres

LAW OF RIVACY

Privacy laws can be broadly classified into:

  • General privacy laws that have an overall bearing on the personal information of individuals and affect the policies that govern many different areas of information.
  • Specific privacy laws that are designed to regulate specific types of information. Some examples include:
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http://www.hznews.com/hznews/201702/t20170226_1144784.shtml

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THE VISUAL PANOPTICON

Background In 1791, English philosopher Jeremy Bentham proposed an architectural innovation designed to lead to safe, humane prisons. He envisioned a prison space constructed as a circular array of inward-pointing cells. Solid walls between the cells would prevent any communication between prisoners, and a small window in the back of the cell would let in light to illuminate the contents. At the center of the ring of cells, Bentham placed an observation tower with special shutters to prevent the prisoners from seeing the guards. This "all-seeing place," or panopticon, was designed to provide complete observation of every prisoner. Bentham's central goal of the panopticon was control through both isolation and the possibility of constant surveilance. A prisoner will constrain his own behavior with the knowledge that some guard may be observing every action, regardless whether anyone is watching at a given moment. Bentham found this Utilitarian ideal of oppressive self-regulation to be appealing in many other social settings, including schools, hospitals, and poor houses, although he achieved only limited success in promoting the idea during his lifetime. Michel Foucault seized on this idea of a controlling space and applied it as a metaphor for the oppressive use of information in a modern disciplinary society. In Discipline and Punish, Foucault observed that control no longer requires physical domination over the body, but can be achieved through isolation and the constant possibility of observation. In modern society, our spaces are organized "like so many cages, so many small theatres, in which each actor is alone, perfectly individualized and constantly visible" (Foucault, 1979). We are seen without seeing our controllers -- information is available on us without any communication. Foucault realized that oppression in the information age is no longer about physical domination and control, but rather the potential for complete knowledge and observation. "Without any physical instrument other than architecture and geometry, [the Panopticon] acts directly on individuals; it gives 'power of mind over mind.'" (Foucault, 1979) Physical intimidation is hardly even relevant in an information society where people need to regulate their own behavior to escape the constant threat of detection. This idea has since become the darling of postmodern cyber-libertarians, who see the oppressive observation of corporate and governmental organizations as the fulfillment of Foucault's vision. The "all-seeing" comes in the form of literal observation through cameras in public spaces and electronic monitoring of workers, but it also has a more figurative element in the data-monitoring of credit agencies and insurance companies. Their view is that a society is being constructed where all behavior will be sharply regulated through the fear of theoretical observation by some oppressive entity. The Virtual Panopticon There has been much ballyhoo about the liberating and decentralizing aspects of new media technologies like the Internet and ubiquitous computing, but the fact remains that new information technologies will be every bit as effective for established organizations as they will be for garage e-zine publishers. It still remains to be seen to what extent the new media technologies will in fact increase the centralization of power by facilitating unprecedented monitoring and observation. I have explored this idea through the virtual construction of Bentham's panopticon as an information space. The user of the space is put in the central place of the information collector and controller, inverting our traditional role as the subject of observation. The faceless prisoners of this space are held in darkness, illuminated only by roving spotlights that prevent them from observing their observers, reinforcing Foucault's idea of a citizen who "is seen, but he does not see; he is the object of information, never a subject in communication" (Foucault, 1979). The spotlights never illuminate the observer, but they probe the darkness to find prisoners who can be examined to divulge their information, in the form of hypertext links. This process of total information through casual examination is unique to a modern society. The space is constructed to yield this information to anyone in the right position, not just to the traditional bearer of physical power. The panopticon is "a machine for creating and sustaining a power relation independent of the person who exercises it; in short, that the inmates should be caught up in a power situation of which they are themselves the bearers" (Foucault 1979). The older physical concepts of information through torture and control are no longer relevant in the panopticon, where any authorized person may casually examine every aspect of life through access to electronic transaction records and direct monitoring of electronic communication. Construction The virtual panopticon was constructed in the Internet-standard Virtual Reality Mark-up Language (VRML), a file format that is used for describing three-dimensional worlds. Code to create a single six-foot cube cell was hand-written and then a standard human figure was inserted into the center of the cell. This pattern was translated and rotated around a central axis to provide for an inward-facing ring of cells. A second level of cells was added, identical to the first, and a concrete floor and two spotlights were added to the scene. The latest version of VRML, version 2.0, allows objects in the scene to move and change with the passage of time and the activities of the user, so the spotlights were set up to scan around the cells, one going clockwise every 20 seconds, the other going counter-clockwise around the cells every 13 seconds. Every prisoner has a hypertext anchor associated with them that will open up a new web page when they are clicked upon. It turned out that it was easier to write a program to create a panopticon than to manually figure out the proper location and orientation of every cell, so a simple Java program was created that would take any number of hypertext links (in the form of Internet URLs) and construct a prison containing one column of cells for each URL.

Engerg,D (2017). TheVisualPanopticon http://besser.tsoa.nyu.edu/impact/f96/Projects/dengberg/

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http://www.hznews.com/hznews/201702/t20170226_1144784.shtml

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THE WALKING MAN

meaning of life

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Don Hertzfeldt

The Animation Show[edit]

Main article: The Animation Show

In 2003, Hertzfeldt created The Animation Show with Beavis and Butt-head creator Mike Judge. It was a biennial North American touring festival that brought independent animated short films to more movie theaters than any distributor in history. The programs were personally curated by Hertzfeldt and Judge. A second Animation Show edition toured throughout 2005, featuring Hertzfeldt's short film The Meaning of Life and new films by animators like Peter Cornwell and Georges Schwizgebel. The third season of The Animation Show began its nationwide release in January 2007, featuring new work by animators Joanna Quinn and Bill Plympton, as well as Hertzfeldt's own Everything Will Be OK.

A stated goal of The Animation Show was to regularly "free the work of these independent artists from the dungeons of Internet exhibition," and bring them into proper movie theaters where most of the short films were meant to be seen. The Animation Show meanwhile launched a supplemental DVD series of animated short films, with content that often varies from the annual theatrical programs. These DVDs were distributed by MTV.

In a March 2008 entry in his blog, Hertzfeldt announced he had decided to leave The Animation Show, after having programmed (and contributing films to) three tours. A fourth season of the program was released in theaters in summer 2008, with no involvement from him.

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Francis Alÿs. When faith moves mountains

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Francis Alÿs. When faith moves mountains

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Passage, Shadows of Humor, BWA Wroclaw, Poland, 2006 (photo: Lukasz Giza)?http://martin-zet.com/en/2006.htm)

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sophie calle

Acclaimed for her photographic and film installations, Sophie Calle’s work reports on encounters and situations that she sets in motion. Whether asking strangers to sleep in her bed, or inviting an author to take charge of her destiny, she documents social interactions that require a pact of complete trust. This exhibition brings together major works from the 1980s to the present.

Born in Paris in 1953, Calle began taking photographs and making notes as she followed strangers on the streets in 1979. Image and text, presented in compelling narratives, have since formed the basis of her work. Poised between private and collective experience, they allude to journalism, anthropology and psychoanalysis, as well as to literature, the diary and the photo novel.

 

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/sophie-calle-talking-to-strangers/

The exhibition premieres the English language version of Prenez soin de vous (Take Care of Yourself), a highlight of the 2007 Venice Biennale. Calle invited 107 women from a ballerina to a lawyer to use their professional skills to interpret an email in which her partner breaks up with her. The poignant, amusing and poetic result forms a large-scale installation that transcends the personal to provide a monument to the women involved.

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http://www.unice.fr/scientificenglish/SciEngBioBlink.html

Parts of the brain are temporarily "switched off" when we blink, scientists have found. Writing in the journal Current Biology, a team from the University College London says that this is true even if light is still entering the eyes. The researchers said this could explain why people do not notice their own blinking, allowing us to have an "uninterrupted view of the world."

A blink lasts for between 100 and 150 milliseconds. We automatically blink 10 to 15 times a minute to moisten and oxygenate the cornea. During a blink, although no light enters the eyes, we do not consciously recognize that everything has momentarily gone dark.

The UCL team set out to discover why humans are not disturbed by these "mini blackouts". They used a specially-designed device that was placed in the mouths of volunteers while they were lying in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. MRI scanners allow brain activity to be monitored.

The device emitted a strong light that lit up the eyeballs through the roof of the mouth. Because of this, the light falling on the eye remained constant even when the participants blinked. This meant that the scientists were able to measure the effects of blinking on the participants’ brain activity independently of the amount of light hitting the eye.

In the experiment, the researchers found that blinking suppressed brain activity in certain parts of the brain, in particular the visual cortex and other areas which are usually activated when people become conscious of visual events or objects in the outside world.

Davina Bristow, who led the research, said: "We would immediately notice if the outside world suddenly went dark, especially if it was happening every few seconds. But we are rarely aware of our blinks, even though they cause a similar reduction in the amount of light entering the eye. Transiently suppressing the brain areas that are involved in visual awareness during blinks may be a neural mechanism for preventing the brain from becoming aware of the world going dark with every blink."

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David Shrigley

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David Shrigley

Shrigley co-directed a film with director Chris Shepherd called Who I Am And What I Want, based on Shrigley's book of the same title, with Kevin Eldon voicing its main character

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PROJECT IN WOOD

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STRUCTURE OF WOOD

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DICTIONARY OF WOOD

DICTIONARY OF WOOD

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FIFTY YEAR OF ARWING

FIFTY YEAR OF ARWING

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Hal Foster

In The Return of the Real Hal Foster discusses the development of art and theory since 1960, and reorders the relation between prewar and postwar avant-gardes. Opposed to the assumption that contemporary art is somehow belated, he argues that the avant-garde returns to us from the future, repositioned by innovative practice in the present. And he poses this retroactive model of art and theory against the reactionary undoing of progressive culture that is pervasive today. After the models of art-as-text in the 1970s and art-as-simulacrum in the 1980s, Foster suggests that we are now witness to a return to the real?to art and theory grounded in the materiality of actual bodies and social sites. If The Return of the Real begins with a new narrative of the historical avant-gard, it concludes with an original reading of this contemporary situation?and what it portends for future practices of art and theory, culture and politics.

download.php?file=2610481&view=206656&emhttps://mitpress.mit.edu/books/return-real

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The Daily Practice of Painting, Gerhard Richter Richter, G. (1995) The Daily Practice of Painting. London: Thames & Hudson

WITNESS is an international organization that trains and supports people using video in their fight for human rights.

a vido

http://m.weibo.cn/5245129803/4050412891365073

i a agree with the sentence that 

>all the master followed:demanding the highest standard of excellence

>improving upon the work of previous masters

>aspiring to the highest quality attainable

it mainly talk about :how Morden art pushed out artistic standard 

 

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color psychology

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RED. Physical Positive: Physical courage, strength, warmth, energy, basic survival, 'fight or flight', stimulation, masculinity, excitement. Negative: Defiance, aggression, visual impact, strain. Being the longest wavelength, red is a powerful colour. Although not technically the most visible, it has the property of appearing to be nearer than it is and therefore it grabs our attention first. Hence its effectiveness in traffic lights the world over. Its effect is physical; it stimulates us and raises the pulse rate, giving the impression that time is passing faster than it is. It relates to the masculine principle and can activate the "fight or flight" instinct. Red is strong, and very basic. Pure red is the simplest colour, with no subtlety. It is stimulating and lively, very friendly. At the same time, it can be perceived as demanding and aggressive

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BLUE. Intellectual. Positive: Intelligence, communication, trust, efficiency, serenity, duty, logic, coolness, reflection, calm. Negative: Coldness, aloofness, lack of emotion, unfriendliness. Blue is the colour of the mind and is essentially soothing; it affects us mentally, rather than the physical reaction we have to red. Strong blues will stimulate clear thought and lighter, soft blues will calm the mind and aid concentration. Consequently it is serene and mentally calming. It is the colour of clear communication. Blue objects do not appear to be as close to us as red ones. Time and again in research, blue is the world's favourite colour. However, it can be perceived as cold, unemotional and unfriendly.

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YELLOW. Emotional Positive: Optimism, confidence, self-esteem, extraversion, emotional strength, friendliness, creativity. Negative: Irrationality, fear, emotional fragility, depression, anxiety, suicide. The yellow wavelength is relatively long and essentially stimulating. In this case the stimulus is emotional, therefore yellow is the strongest colour, psychologically. The right yellow will lift our spirits and our self-esteem; it is the colour of confidence and optimism. Too much of it, or the wrong tone in relation to the other tones in a colour scheme, can cause self-esteem to plummet, giving rise to fear and anxiety. Our "yellow streak" can surface.

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GREEN. Balance Positive: Harmony, balance, refreshment, universal love, rest, restoration, reassurance, environmental awareness, equilibrium, peace. Negative: Boredom, stagnation, blandness, enervation. Green strikes the eye in such a way as to require no adjustment whatever and is, therefore, restful. Being in the centre of the spectrum, it is the colour of balance - a more important concept than many people realise. When the world about us contains plenty of green, this indicates the presence of water, and little danger of famine, so we are reassured by green, on a primitive level. Negatively, it can indicate stagnation and, incorrectly used, will be perceived as being too bland.

http://www.colour-affects.co.uk/psychological-properties-of-colours

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Zarah Hussain: Numina 1 October 2016 - 25 January 2017 Foyers

Jenny Holtzer

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download.php?file=2610078&view=206656&emit really impressed me by looking at the big sign. actually he project the words on different places , and keep this project for a decade. 

http://projects.jennyholzer.com/projections/singapore-2006/gallery#0

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Cory Arcangel

Cory Arcangel is a leading exponent of technology-based art, drawn to video games and software for their ability to rapidly formulate new communities and traditions and, equally, their speed of obsolescence. It was in 1996, while studying classical guitar at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, that he first had a high-speed internet connection ? inspiring him to major in music technology and start learning to code. Both music and coding remain his key tools for interrogating the stated purpose of software and gadgets. In Super Mario Clouds (2002), for example, he disabled the vintage Nintendo game to leave only the iconic backdrop of blue sky and clouds; in Drei Klavierstücke op.11 (2009) Arcangel recreated Arnold Schoenberg?s 1909 score of the same name by editing together YouTube clips of cats playing pianos, note for note, paw by paw. Outcomes can be surprising, funny and poignant, whether in the final form of installation, video, printed media or music composition, in the gallery or on the world wide web. Reconfiguring web design and hacking as artistic practice, Arcangel remains faithful to open source culture and makes his work and methods available online, thus superimposing a perpetual question-mark as to the value of the art object.download.php?file=2610040&view=206656&em

Cory Arcangel Mig 29 Soviet Fighter Plane, Clouds and OSX, 2016 Mig 29 Soviet Fighter Plane and Clouds (2005) Nintendo Entertainment System .nes Roms, Two Macminis running OS X, Nintendo emulators (Open Emu), variable multi-channel presentation Dimensions variable

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chinese cultural revolution

outside

Erica scourti

http://www.ericascourti.com/art_pages/artwork.html

Erica Scourti was born in Athens, Greece and is now based in London and Athens. Her work across different media draws on personal experience to explore life, labour, gender and love in a fully mediated world. She has exhibited recently at Microscope Gallery, New York, HeK Basel, FACT, The Photographers’ Gallery, Hayward Gallery, Munich Kunstverein, Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens, Banner Repeater, and The Royal Standard. She has recently presented performances and talks at the Whitechapel Gallery, South London Gallery, the Royal College of Art, Chelsea College of Art, Goethe Institut, London, the Sandberg Institute, Amsterdam, Goldsmiths College, London, the Dutch Art Institute, Transmediale, ICA, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, David Roberts Art Foundation and Southbank Centre, London.  Recent shows include Big Bang Data at Somerset House, Trace Programme at Flo Skatepark, Nottingham, Dark Archives, a solo commission at Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam, and a performance at Block Universe festival 2016. In 2015 Erica was in residence at Wysing Arts Centre and the White Building, London, and in 2016 she attended the Saari Residence in Finland, with Autoitalia; and she is a Near Now Fellow 2015/6. She presented a performance at Somerset House as part of Block Universe 2016 and has created a new commission for the Wellcome Collection’s exhibition, Bedlam: the Asylum and Beyond (opens Sept 2016).

 

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Hito Teyerl Extracto de "How Not to Be Seen: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File"

Flash animation
Downloadvideoplayback.mp4.2 [13.06MB]
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Jeremy Bentham

 

The philosopher and jurist Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) was born in Spitalfields, London, on 15 February 1748. He proved to be something of a child prodigy: while still a toddler he was discovered sitting at his father's desk reading a multi-volume history of England, and he began to study Latin at the age of three. At twelve, he was sent to Queen's College Oxford, his father, a prosperous attorney, having decided that Jeremy would follow him into the law, and feeling quite sure that his brilliant son would one day be Lord Chancellor of England. 

Bentham, however, soon became disillusioned with the law, especially after hearing the lectures of the leading authority of the day, Sir William Blackstone (1723-80). Instead of practising the law, he decided to write about it, and he spent his life criticising the existing law and suggesting ways for its improvement. His father's death in 1792 left him financially independent, and for nearly forty years he lived quietly in Westminster, producing between ten and twenty sheets of manuscript a day, even when he was in his eighties. 

Even for those who have never read a line of Bentham, he will always be associated with the doctrine of Utilitarianism and the principle of `the greatest happiness of the greatest number'. This, however, was only his starting point for a radical critique of society, which aimed to test the usefulness of existing institutions, practices and beliefs against an objective evaluative standard. He was an outspoken advocate of law reform, a pugnacious critic of established political doctrines like natural law and contractarianism, and the first to produce a utilitarian justification for democracy. He also had much to say of note on subjects as diverse as prison reform, religion, poor relief, international law, and animal welfare. A visionary far ahead of his time, he advocated universal suffrage and the decriminalisation of homosexuality.

By the 1820s Bentham had become a widely respected figure, both in Britain and in other parts of the world. His ideas were greatly to influence the reforms of public administration made during the nineteenth century, and his writings are still at the centre of academic debate, especially as regards social policy, legal positivism, and welfare economics. Research into his work continues at UCL in theBentham Project, set up in the early 1960s with the aim of producing the first scholarly edition of his works and correspondence, a projected total of some seventy volumes!download.php?file=2575543&view=206656&emdownload.php?file=2575544&view=206656&em

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/Bentham-Project/who

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Mig 29 Soviet Fighter Plane, Clouds and OSX, 2016

panopticon

there is a basic concept of panopticon prison. it is invented by Jeremy Bentham in 1785.  It is combined by a tower which build for those police to monitor criminals and a ring shape prison for criminals to live in.    

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Oliver Pietsch

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id like to say that his film is really interesting,although its a little bit of creepy, but the theme it self is creepy, he use variety movie shot and other film shot to create the effect, let me feel many people were suffer from the death 

http://www.nettiehorn.com/images/artists/Oliver%20Pietsch/Html%20Images/01Oliver_Pietsch_01.htm

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The "rose of temperaments" (Temperamenten-Rose) compiled by Goethe and Schiller in 1798/9.

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The "rose of temperaments" (Temperamenten-Rose) compiled by Goethe and Schiller in 1798/9.

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chinese culture revolution

In 1966, China?s Communist leader Mao Zedong launched what became known as the Cultural Revolution in order to reassert his authority over the Chinese government. Believing that current Communist leaders were taking the party, and China itself, in the wrong direction, Mao called on the nation?s youth to purge the ?impure? elements of Chinese society and revive the revolutionary spirit that had led to victory in the civil war 20 decades earlier and the formation of the People?s Republic of China. The Cultural Revolution continued in various phases until Mao?s death in 1976, and its tormented and violent legacy would resonate in Chinese politics and society for decades to come.download.php?file=2610272&view=206656&em

Zhou acted to stabilize China by reviving educational system and restoring numerous former officials to power. In 1972, however, Mao suffered a stroke; in the same year, Zhou learned he had cancer. The two leaders threw their support to Deng Xiaoping (who had been purged during the first phase of the Cultural Revolution), a development opposed by the more radical Jiang and her allies, who became known as the Gang of Four. In the next several years, Chinese politics teetered between the two sides. The radicals finally convinced Mao to purge Deng in April 1976, a few months after Zhou?s death, but after Mao died that September, a civil, police and military coalition pushed the Gang of Four out. Deng regained power in 1977, and would maintain control over Chinese government for the next 20 years. Some 1.5 million people were killed during the Cultural Revolution, and millions of others suffered imprisonment, seizure of property, torture or general humiliation. The Cultural Revolution?s short-term effects may have been felt mainly in China?s cities, but its long-term effects would impact the entire country for decades to come. Mao?s large-scale attack on the party and system he had created would eventually produce a result opposite to what he intended, leading many Chinese to lose faith in their government altogether.

http://www.history.com/topics/cultural-revolution

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COMBINATION 3

COLOR PSYCHOLOGY 2

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VIOLET. Spiritual Positive: Spiritual awareness, containment, vision, luxury, authenticity, truth, quality. Negative: Introversion, decadence, suppression, inferiority. The shortest wavelength is violet, often described as purple. It takes awareness to a higher level of thought, even into the realms of spiritual values. It is highly introvertive and encourages deep contemplation, or meditation. It has associations with royalty and usually communicates the finest possible quality. Being the last visible wavelength before the ultra-violet ray, it has associations with time and space and the cosmos. Excessive use of purple can bring about too much introspection and the wrong tone of it communicates something cheap and nasty, faster than any other colour.

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PINK. Positive: Physical tranquillity, nurture, warmth, femininity, love, sexuality, survival of the species. Negative: Inhibition, emotional claustrophobia, emasculation, physical weakness. Being a tint of red, pink also affects us physically, but it soothes, rather than stimulates. (Interestingly, red is the only colour that has an entirely separate name for its tints. Tints of blue, green, yellow, etc. are simply called light blue, light greenetc.) Pink is a powerful colour, psychologically. It represents the feminine principle, and survival of the species; it is nurturing and physically soothing. Too much pink is physically draining and can be somewhat emasculating.

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GREY. Positive: Psychological neutrality. Negative: Lack of confidence, dampness, depression, hibernation, lack of energy. Pure grey is the only colour that has no direct psychological properties. It is, however, quite suppressive. A virtual absence of colour is depressing and when the world turns grey we are instinctively conditioned to draw in and prepare for hibernation. Unless the precise tone is right, grey has a dampening effect on other colours used with it. Heavy use of grey usually indicates a lack of confidence and fear of exposure.

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BLACK. Positive: Sophistication, glamour, security, emotional safety, efficiency, substance. Negative: Oppression, coldness, menace, heaviness. Black is all colours, totally absorbed. The psychological implications of that are considerable. It creates protective barriers, as it absorbs all the energy coming towards you, and it enshrouds the personality. Black is essentially an absence of light, since no wavelengths are reflected and it can, therefore be menacing; many people are afraid of the dark. Positively, it communicates absolute clarity, with no fine nuances. It communicates sophistication and uncompromising excellence and it works particularly well with white. Black creates a perception of weight and seriousness. It is a myth that black clothes are slimming: Which of these boxes do you think is bigger/heavier?

http://www.colour-affects.co.uk/psychological-properties-of-colours

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MIKE KELLEY

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Day is Done is a feature-length ?musical? composed of thirty-two separate video chapters. Each section is a live-action recreation of a photograph of an ?extracurricular activity? found in a high school yearbook. Over the years Mike Kelley has collected hundreds of such images and arranged them into rough categories. Most of the imagery is immediately recognizable as standard forms of folk entertainment: plays, follies, theme dress-up days, holiday festivities, religious spectacles, hazing rituals, etc. Such activities serve as carnivalesque disruptions of the normal school schedule, mirroring the function of such events in the broader cultural arena. Many of them, such as Halloween and Christmas-related activities, are secular outgrowths of pagan ritual. Unlike Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstruction #1 (A Domestic Scene), which is a thirty minute drama based on a single photograph of a stage play, Day is Done is multipart with iconography derived from the image files Kelley has labelled such as: religious performances, thugs, dance numbers, hicks, and hillbillies, Halloween and gothic style, satanic imagery, and equestrian events. The artist chose to work with such a diverse set of images in order to force himself to create a longer, more complex, video work somewhat akin to traditional filmic narratives employing montage. Though not a traditional narrative, Day is Done employs recurring characters, intimations of simultaneous action, and some semblance of narrative flow. Day is Done exists in several different forms. The one shown at Gagosian Gallery is a large-scale video installation consisting of sets and projection screens. Various scenes are programmed to turn off and on prompting the viewer to follow the action throughout the presentational space. Several scenes will run simultaneously in order to promote the effect of filmic cross-cutting in actual space

Day is Done 2005 Gagosian Gallery, New York.

http://mikekelley.com/portfolio/day-is-done/

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LAURA OWENS

Moon, 2009 Binder's board, paper, glue, and collage, 11 x 6.5 x .75"

http://owenslaura.com/book/moon-book/download.php?file=2611102&view=206656&em

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LAURA OWENS

moving image also can tell story not only animation

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http://owenslaura.com/book/embroidery-book/?a=1

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art scope

https://youtu.be/_ZLMMAj-k-A

its a video teach how to make artscope 

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Diseño textil mexicano – Ilustración de stock

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http://sp.depositphotos.com/24447747/stock-illustration-mexican-textile-design.htmldownload.php?file=2611067&view=206656&emdownload.php?file=2611059&view=206656&em

download.php?file=2611052&view=206656&em

JUST MAKES ME TO DESIGN MY ART SCOPE SOMETIMES THE IMAGE CAN BE SOME THING COLOR FOR AND ASSOCIATED WITH TRADITION 

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Orlan is a performance artist who uses her own body and the procedures of plastic surgery to make "carnal art"

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orlan is a performance artist who uses her own body and the procedures of plastic surgery to make "carnal art"

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HITO " HOW TO MAKE U NOT SEE"

TAHT THING IS GREEN !!!!!!

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXMMzL5THPk

Fischer 's work really help me to do the model

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fifty years of drawing

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https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/dec/08/mass-surveillance-exposed-edward-snowden-not-justified-by-fight-against-terrorism

The ?secret, massive and indiscriminate? surveillance conducted by intelligence services and disclosed by the former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowdencannot be justified by the fight against terrorism, the most senior human rights official in Europe has warned.

In a direct challenge to the United Kingdom and other states, Nils Mui?nieks, the commissioner for human rights at the Council of Europe, calls for greater transparency and stronger democratic oversight of the way security agencies monitor the internet. He also said that so-called Five Eyes intelligence-sharing treaty between the UK, US, Australia, New Zealand and Canada should be published.

?Suspicionless mass retention of communications data is fundamentally contrary to the rule of law ? and ineffective,? the Latvian official argues in a 120-page report, The Rule of Law on the Internet in the Wider Digital World. ?Member states should not resort to it or impose compulsory retention of data by third parties.?

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CIA

Privacy and Civil Liberties at CIA

The United States Government, including the CIA, has a solemn obligation to protect fully the legal rights of all Americans, including freedoms, civil liberties, and privacy rights guaranteed by federal law. The CIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates critical foreign intelligence information to national security policymakers in a manner consistent with this obligation.

All of the CIA’s intelligence activities must be properly authorized, and the collection, retention, or dissemination of information concerning United States persons may only be conducted pursuant to specific procedures approved by the Director of the CIA and the Attorney General. While the protection of national security requires that many of the CIA’s intelligence activities remain secret, in order to improve public understanding and trust and to allow the public to hold CIA to account, CIA has released its procedures for protecting Americans’ personal information and has provided an extensive explanation of the authorizations and limitations regarding such information.

https://www.cia.gov/about-cia/privacy-and-civil-liberties

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PRISM

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ADRESS BOOK

SOPHIE CALLE 

The Address Book, a key and controversial work in Sophie Calle's oeuvre, lies at the epicenter of many layers of reality and fiction. Having found a lost address book on the street in Paris, Calle copied the pages before returning it anonymously to its owner. She then embarked on a search to come to know this stranger by contacting listed individuals--in essence, following him through the map of his acquaintances. Originally published as a serial in the newspaper Libération over the course of one month, her incisive written accounts with friends, family and colleagues, juxtaposed with photographs, yield vivid subjective impressions of the address book's owner, Pierre D., while also suggesting ever more complicated stories as information is parsed and withheld by the people she encounters. Collaged through a multitude of details--from the banal to the luminous, this fragile and strangely intimate portrait of Pierre D. is a prism through which to see the desire for, and the elusivity of, knowledge. Upon learning of this work and its publication in the newspaper, Pierre D. expressed his anger, and Calle agreed not to republish the work until after his death. Until then, The Address Book had only been described in English--as the work of the character Maria Turner, whom Paul Auster based on Calle in his novel Leviathan; and in Double Game, Calle's monograph which converses with Auster's novel. This is the first trade publication in English of The Address Book (Gemini G.E.L. in Los Angeles released a suite of lithographs modeled on the original tabloid pages from Libération in an edition of 24). The book has the physical weight and feel of an actual address book with a new design of text and images which allow the story to unfold and be savored by the reader.

http://www.artbook.com/9780979956294.html

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http://www.hznews.com/hznews/201702/t20170226_1144784.shtml

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http://www.hznews.com/hznews/201702/t20170226_1144784.shtml

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Francis Alÿs. When faith moves mountains

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4714067.stm

 
Blink and you really do 'miss it'
Eye
We blink 10 to 15 times each minute
Parts of the brain are temporarily "switched off" when we blink, scientists have found.

The team from University College London found the brain shut down parts of the visual system for each blink.

Writing in Current Biology, they said this was the case even if light was still entering the eyes.

The researchers said this could explain why people do not notice their own blinking, as it gave us an "uninterrupted view of the world".

A blink lasts for between 100 and 150 milliseconds. We automatically blink 10 to 15 times a minute to moisten and oxygenate the cornea.

During a blink, there is no visual input and no light, but we do not consciously recognise everything has momentarily gone dark.

The UCL team set out to discover why humans are not disturbed by these "mini blackouts".

The study used a specially-designed device to assess the effects of blinking on the brain.

'World goes dark'

The device, made with fibre optic cable, was placed in the mouths of volunteers who were wearing light proof goggles and lying in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scanner.

 

Optic test
The device used in the test lights up eyes through the mouth

 

The optical fibre lit up the eyeballs through the roof of the mouth using a strong light - making the head glow red.

This meant that the light falling on the retina in the eye remained constant even when the participants blinked.

The scientists were then able to measure the effects of blinking on brain activity independently of the effect of eyelid closure on light entering the eye.

They found that blinking suppressed brain activity in the visual cortex and other areas of the brain - known as parietal and prefrontal - which are usually activated when people become conscious of visual events or objects in the outside world.

Davina Bristow, from UCL's Institute of Neurology, who led the research, said: "We would immediately notice if the outside world suddenly went dark, especially if it was happening every few seconds.

"But we are rarely aware of our blinks, even though they cause a similar reduction in the amount of light entering the eye, and this gives us an uninterrupted view of the world."

She added: "Transiently suppressing the brain areas involved in visual awareness during blinks may be a neural mechanism for preventing the brain from becoming aware of the eyelid sweeping down over the pupil during a blink and the world going dark."

The research was funded by the Wellcome Trust

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David Shrigley

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PROJECT IN WOOD

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DICTIONARY OF WOODS

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DICTIONARY OF WOODS

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sarah morris

http://www.sarahmorris.com/films/strange-magic/

the audio of i[strange magic] works pretty well for me .download.php?file=2610453&view=206656&em

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Toba Khedoori

Khedoori's works have comprised intricate details, models or architectural renderings set within the broad expanses of waxed paper or linen. This delicate combination frequently necessitates close viewing which results, then, in the works filling the spectator's entire field of visiondownload.php?file=2610423&view=206656&em

http://www.davidzwirner.com/artists/toba-khedoori/

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http://boglio.tumblr.com/post/153531483393

ILLUSTRATION

it gives me a brand new perspective of illustration,not only pen can illustrate but screen, sometimes illustration is not only about graphic!

Deep Playdownload.php?file=2609936&view=206656&em

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ARTIST ABOUT FILM EDITING

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Douglas Gordon, Self Portrait of You + Me (Jackie smiling II), 2008, burned print, smoke and mirror, 45 3/8 × 36 13/16 inches (115.2 × 93.5 cm) © lost but found

Gordon is a conjurer of collective memory and perceptual surprise whose tools include commodities and mechanisms of everyday life. Into a diverse body of work?which spans narrative video and film, sound, photographic objects, and texts both as site?specific installation and printed media?he infuses a combination of humor and trepidation to recalibrate reactions to the familiar

http://www.gagosian.com/artists/douglas-gordon

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book of witness2,its mainly talk about some society phenomenon witness by a reporter

book of witness

download.php?file=2609423&view=206656&emBased on the BBC television series, John Berger's Ways of Seeing is a unique look at the way we view art, published as part of the Penguin on Design series in Penguin Modern Classics. 'Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak.' 'But there is also another sense in which seeing comes before words. It is seeing which establishes our place in the surrounding world; we explain that world with words, but word can never undo the fact that we are surrounded by it. The relation between what we see and what we know is never settled.' John Berger's Ways of Seeing is one of the most stimulating and influential books on art in any language. First published in 1972, it was based on the BBC television series about which the Sunday Times critic commented: 'This is an eye-opener in more ways than one: by concentrating on how we look at paintings . . . he will almost certainly change the way you look at pictures.' By now he has. John Berger (b. 1926) is an art critic, painter and novelist.born in Hackney, London. His novel G. (1972) won both the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Booker Prize. If you enjoyed Ways of Seeing, you might like Susan Sontag's On Photography, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'Berger has the ability to cut right through the mystification of professional art critics ... he is a liberator of images: and once we have allowed the paintings to work on us directly, we are in a much better position to make a meaningful evaluation' Peter Fuller, Arts Review 'The influence of the series and the book ... was enormous ... It opened up for general attention areas of cultural study that are now commonplace' Geoff Dyer in Ways of Telling 'One of the most influential intellectuals of our time' Observer Penguin Classics Published 25th September 2008 176 Pages 111mm x 181mm x 13mm 132g John Berger Read more at https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/56465/ways-of-seeing/#zElmRqR0DoCgerhO.99

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protest

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The Cultural Revolution

What was it and when did it begin?

The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution was a decade-long period of political and social chaos caused by Mao Zedong?s bid to use the Chinese masses to reassert his control over the Communist party.

Its bewildering complexity and almost unfathomable brutality was such that to this day historians struggle to make sense of everything that occurred during the period.

However, Mao?s decision to launch the ?revolution? in May 1966 is now widely interpreted as an attempt to destroy his enemies by unleashing the people on the party and urging them to purify its ranks.

When the mass mobilisation kicked off party newspapers depicted it as an epochal struggle that would inject new life into the socialist cause. ?Like the red sun rising in the east, the unprecedented Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution is illuminating the land with its brilliant rays,? one editorial read.

In fact, the Cultural Revolution crippled the economy, ruined millions of lives and thrust China into 10 years of turmoil, bloodshed, hunger and stagnation.

Gangs of students and Red Guards attacked people wearing ?bourgeois clothes? on the street, ?imperialist? signs were torn down and intellectuals and party officials were murdered or driven to suicide.

After violence had run its bloody course, the country?s rulers conceded it had been a catastrophe that had brought nothing but ?grave disorder, damage and retrogression?.

An official party reckoning described it as a catastrophe which had caused ?the most severe setback and the heaviest losses suffered by the party, the country, and the people since the founding of the People?s Republic? in 1949.

Whose idea was it and what was the aim?

The Cultural Revolution was the brainchild of China?s ?Great Helmsman?, Chairman Mao Zedong.

Seventeen years after his troops seized power, Mao saw his latest political campaign as a way of reinvigorating the communist revolution by strengthening ideology and weeding out opponents.

?Our objective is to struggle against and crush those persons in authority who are taking the capitalist road... so as to facilitate the consolidation and development of the socialist system,? one early directive stated.

Frank Dikötter, the author of a new book on the period, says Mao hoped his movement would make China the pinnacle of the socialist universe and turn him into ?the man who leads planet Earth into communism.

But it was also an attempt by the elderly dictator, whose authority had been badly hit by the calamitous Great Famine of the 1950s, to reassert control over the party by obliterating enemies, real or imagined.

?It was a power struggle waged... behind the smokescreen of a fictitious mass movement,? Belgian scholar Pierre Ryckmans wrote in his damning account of the Cultural Revolution, The Chairman?s New Clothes.

 

Historians believe somewhere between 500,000 and two million people lost their lives as a result of the Cultural Revolution.

Perhaps the worst affected region was the southern province of Guangxi where there were reports of mass killings and even cannibalism. 

Appalling acts of barbarity also occurred in Inner Mongolia where authorities unleashed a vicious campaign of torture against supposed separatists.

Even China?s feline population suffered as Red Guards tried to eliminate what they claimed was a symbol of ?bourgeois decadence?. ?Walking through the streets of the capital at the end of August [1966], people saw dead cats lying by the roadside with their front paws tied together,? writes Dikötter.

Yet contrary to popular belief, the government was responsible for most of the bloodshed, not the Red Guards.

?We read a lot of horror stories about students beating their teachers to death in the stairwell,? says Andrew Walder, the author of China Under Mao.

?[But] based on the government?s own published histories well over half, if not two-thirds of the people who were killed or imprisoned during the Cultural Revolution suffered that from 1968 to early 1970? as the army moved in to halt the violence.

The lives of some of the Communist party?s most powerful figures were upended by the turbulence, including future leader Deng Xiaoping, who was purged in 1967, and Xi Zhongxun, the father of China?s current president, Xi Jinping, who was publicly humiliated, beaten and sent into exile.

President Xi?s half-sister, Xi Heping, is said to have taken her own life after being persecuted.

download.php?file=2575785&view=206656&em

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/11/the-cultural-revolution-50-years-on-all-you-need-to-know-about-chinas-political-convulsion

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visual effect

 light  reflect from the object to our eyes 

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panopticon

download.php?file=2575533&view=206656&emthrough panopticon, people who monitor those  prisoner  have the right to choose  to monitor or not . however prisoners  will be so worry about if some one is monitoring them which lead them to behave themselves. download.php?file=2575530&view=206656&em   download.php?file=2575535&view=206656&emdownload.php?file=2575536&view=206656&emdownload.php?file=2575532&view=206656&em

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Image

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Die Verlorenen at the Internet Movie Database

Reynold Reynolds

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Christian Marclay

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Michaël Borremans

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Michaël Borremans paintings are many things ? beautiful, mysterious and magnificently crafted. They speak of a time past, of forgotten wartime civilians and heroic endeavour. Men and women dressed in 1940?s clothes are pictured engaged in meticulous, unknowable tasks, their heads often bowed in concentration. What the paintings? protagonists are doing is often unclear? in Trickland (I- Large) a group of women are huddled over the model of a landscape, tending to miniature props. Are they moving objects in a wartime strategy game? We can?t be sure, only their intense concentration is palpable. Likewise Examination features a couple of workers staring attentively at an unseen object, the man?s hand poised in mid air with what seems to be a scalpel in his hand. Both are dressed in factory clothing, at odds with the delicacy of the implied surgical task. As in many of Borreman?s paintings, the scene takes place in dark nameless rooms, the location and time are indiscernible. These paintings are a celebration of the craft of painting and it?s ability to resonate in our hearts and minds. Nostalgia and memory are present in the work but it never sinks into a sentimental past, Borremans makes sure of this through the inclusion of unexpected details. Look out for The Saddening for example, where the text of a song from the film Dirty Dancing is written on the surface of a table, or more seriously, the thalidomide detail of the workers in The Lucky Ones. Michaël Borremans was born in 1963 in Geraardsbergen, Belgium. He lives and works in Ghent and has had solo exhibitions in Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, America and most recently England. The Performance is the main painting show in the Academy?s summer programme and will include over 25 works borrowed from public and private collections in Europe and the United States. This exhibition which has toured to our colleagues in the Parasol Unit, London and SMAK, Ghent is the first museum exhibition of his work in Ireland. In collaboration with the Irish Times

http://www.rhagallery.ie/exhibitions/2165/

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combination

combination 2

COLOR PSYCHOLOGY 3

What is it about the rainbow that gives most people a sense of happiness? Sure, it signifies the calm after a storm, but the colors themselves have an effect on our minds. There is a reason why people prefer certain colors over others. This preference says volumes about our personalities, because each color has an association with a reaction our brain has when we internalize it. Color psychology is a well-known, yet less explored branch of the study of how our brain perceives what it visualizes. As far as scientific research goes, there is not much to work with. However, the impact that colors have on our brains is used to manipulate our decision making by multiple facets of society.

Color is, simply stated, broken down white light. This is a dissection of light at different wavelengths and each wavelength is perceived as a separate color. Objects tend to absorb or reflect these wavelengths, so when we see a yellow lemon, it is the yellow wavelength that is being reflected while all others are being absorbed. Now that we have understood what color means, let?s explore some of the ways it influences our mood. We feel color. How or what we feel about it varies from person to person. Some colors give us a sense of serenity and calm;these usually lie within the blue side of the spectrum-that consists of purple and green too, known as the cool side. Others induce rage and make us uncomfortable , or signify passion; these lie within the red spectrum-which includes orange and yellow, known as the warm side. Color perception is subjective, and certain colors have a very universal significance. This is coded into our reptilian brain, giving us that instinctive feeling of fire being dangerous and the beach being relaxing.

Color psychology is a very important tool used by artists, interior decorators, and as a marketing mechanism in many industries. It is the palette used by Dali that makes his artwork bizarre, and amplifies the hyperrealism he intends to create. When we visit a museum to appreciate a work of art, we take it in through the colors we see because they invoke within us certain emotions, making the claim that everyone sees it differently a reality. Interior decorators survey the effect of colors when deciding what color (Or rather color associations) the walls of a certain area in a building will be painted. The reason that many offices have a lot of greys, blues and browns incorporated in their décor is because these colors tends to increase productivity. Yet, this is not a rule of the thumb. This does hold true for a corporate environment, but if one were to work say for example in the fashion industry, or the media, the use of brighter and more ?colorful? paints would help encourage creativity. Many car commercials show black as their model, because this certain color is associated with affluence and seriousness. This leads the consumer to believe that the product is worth buying. Even the food and drink industry uses color to attract more people to certain brands. The purple and gold packaging of a certain brand of candy bar is a technique to lure the consumer into believing that this is chocolate royalty, and why would one not want to buy the best of best. Culturally speaking, colors have different values attached to them too. A bride in the western world wears white, where as it is what a widow wears in South Asia. Color stimulates our brain, and from the ancient times has proven to be useful alternative psychotherapy. The Egyptians and Chinese used colors to heal, a process that is known is chromotherapy. Colors were used to in order to help the body function better. However there is a lot of doubt that prevails today as far as the effectiveness of color therapy is concerned. Since every human being has different emotions attached to different colors, the universal significance of colors may or may not work in these cases. Bottom line being, color psychology and associations are an interesting part of the complex working system of our brain, yet with so many scientific questions about it still left unanswered , and differences in cultural attachments to colors, it can only be utilized through observation and experience of how color has influenced brains over the years

http://www.colorpsychology.orgdownload.php?file=2610601&view=206656&em

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Robert Therrien

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is delighted to present Robert Therrien: Works 1975?1995, the first major solo exhibition in Europe of the artist?s works from this 20-year period. The exhibition of 43 works includes sculptures, reliefs and works on paper executed in two and three dimensions and various media. The show marks a significant contribution to art history at a crucial period within the artist?s oeuvre, and is especially important as a number of these early works are held in private collections and have not been seen in public for many years. Robert Therrien?s earlier works interact with some of the vital art movements of the late twentieth century, including Minimalism, Pop Art and Conceptualism. Taking his inspiration from everyday things ? a water pitcher, a hat, a snowman, a cloud, for example ? he simplifies their form and manipulates the scale of his then idealised motifs, which recur in various forms in his immaculately, resolved works. Understanding that the theme of a simple snowman motif is change ? snow melts and eventually reforms as snow ? offers insights into his other works, all of which are equally immediate and confounding. Therrien?s use of the familiar and domestic creates a tangible narrative of childhood memories within his early oeuvre and has provided the vocabulary that has shaped the renowned and immersive sculptures of his later work. For this exhibition at Parasol unit, the ground floor gallery shows the artist?s works from the 1990s. It includes No title (Dutch Doors), 1993, a sculpture formed of two identical rectangular shapes stacked one above the other, mounted to the wall and extending out from it at different angles. Although passage through them is obstructed by the gallery wall, they have a quiet welcoming openness and relate to the open, pointed portal of the artist?s purple arch sculpture on the opposite wall. Therrien also pays homage to the humble pitcher in his simple, modestly-sized rendering of No title (Pitcher with yellow spout), 1990, while giving it a commanding presence in the over-sized, wall-mounted sculpture of the same motif with a black spout. In the upper gallery, among Therrien?s works from the 1980s, are the simple silhouettes of a red chapel and a tin-on-bronze snowman, as well as an aubergine coloured cloud with faucets. The cloud, created from three rounded shapes, suggests a state of flux, with the taps evoking some imminent precipitation and its inevitable dissolution. This transformation of something of an impermanent nature into a simple solid object suggests the precariousness of reality and poignancy of constant change. A comprehensive publication accompanies the exhibition along with a programme of educational events that aims to engage the public with Robert Therrien?s contribution to art history.

Robert Therrien Works 1975?1995 2 October ? 11 December 2016

http://parasol-unit.org/robert-therrien-works-1975-1995download.php?file=2611018&view=206656&em

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Diether Roth

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CLAY SAMPLE

P.o.TH.A.A.VFB (Portrait of the artist as Vogelfutterbüste) Düsseldorf / Cologne · 1968 · chocolate cast with bird food addition 21x14x12 cm · edition of 30 made by Rudolf Rieser, Cologne (Dobke 1968.10)

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Dorothy Cross, Eye of Shark, 2014?

HITO 2

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IT IS A JAPANESE DESIGN. IT MEAN TO CREAT SOMETHING RELATED TO OLYMPIC

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HOW TO MAKE ART SCOPEhttps://www.google.com.hk/search?q=how+to+make+kaleidoscope&safe=strict&client=safari&channel=iphone_bm&biw=1218&bih=648&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi_xMSw_fDQAhVM7yYKHcPIALAQsAQINA#imgrc=qWHUkLIbGfXXHM%3A

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ON THE TOP OF ANOTHER ROCK

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ON THE TOP OF ANOTHER ROCK

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A ROCK ON THE TOP OF ANOTHER ROCK

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ROCK ON THE TOP OF ANOTHER ROCK

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THIS IS A BOOK WRITE BY DEVID AND FEISCH

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INFLUENCE BY URS FISCHER

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THE DESK

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different disorder

Types of Mental Illness There are many different conditions that are recognized as mental illnesses. The more common types include: Anxiety disorders: People with anxiety disorders respond to certain objects or situations with fear and dread, as well as with physical signs of anxiety or panic, such as a rapid heartbeat and sweating. An anxiety disorder is diagnosed if the person's response is not appropriate for the situation, if the person cannot control the response, or if the anxiety interferes with normal functioning. Anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and specific phobias. Mood disorders: These disorders, also called affective disorders, involve persistent feelings of sadness or periods of feeling overly happy, or fluctuations from extreme happiness to extreme sadness. The most common mood disorders are depression, bipolar disorder, and cyclothymic disorder. Psychotic disorders: Psychotic disorders involve distorted awareness and thinking. Two of the most common symptoms of psychotic disorders are hallucinations -- the experience of images or sounds that are not real, such as hearing voices -- and delusions, which are false fixed beliefs that the ill person accepts as true, despite evidence to the contrary. Schizophrenia is an example of a psychotic disorder. Eating disorders: Eating disorders involve extreme emotions, attitudes, and behaviors involving weight and food. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder are the most common eating disorders. Impulse control and addiction disorders: People with impulse control disorders are unable to resist urges, or impulses, to perform acts that could be harmful to themselves or others. Pyromania (starting fires), kleptomania (stealing), and compulsive gambling are examples of impulse control disorders. Alcohol and drug are common objects of addictions. Often, people with these disorders become so involved with the objects of their addiction that they begin to ignore responsibilities and relationships. Personality disorders: People with personality disorders have extreme and inflexible personality traits that are distressing to the person and/or cause problems in work, school, or social relationships. In addition, the person's patterns of thinking and behavior significantly differ from the expectations of society and are so rigid that they interfere with the person's normal functioning. Examples include antisocial personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, and paranoid personality disorder. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): People with OCD are plagued by constant thoughts or fears that cause them to perform certain rituals or routines. The disturbing thoughts are called obsessions, and the rituals are called compulsions. An example is a person with an unreasonable fear of germs who constantly washes his or her hands. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): PTSD is a condition that can develop following a traumatic and/or terrifying event, such as a sexual or physical assault, the unexpected death of a loved one, or a natural disaster. People with PTSD often have lasting and frightening thoughts and memories of the event, and tend to be emotionally numb.

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/mental-health-types-illness

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